Archive for the ‘assumptions’ Category

Prince of Persia

November 9, 2009

Sooo…. let me get this straight. You had folks like this chick and this guy to carry this movie:


And YOU CHOSE this guy and this chick?


I’m sorry, what planet are you living on, Hollywood? Because it’s not the same planet I’m living on.

Also, it looks like a terrible movie.

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Maine, Or, the Legacy of Why We Don’t Vote on Human Rights Issues

November 4, 2009

“Someone in power is finally going to state the obvious truth that gay marriage is absolutely necessary, and they’re not going to put it up for a vote, because that’s not what you do with basic human rights. You don’t let six wolves and four sheep vote on what to have for dinner (or in this case, what, fifty-two wolves and forty-eight sheep?).

The National Guard will stand outside the courthouses and force you to grow the hell up, and you will be remembered in history like those sad ugly white people yelling at the black kids coming to class.

And this isn’t the fifties. This is the twenty-first century. Your bisexual grandkids will still be able to Google your sorry ass and see that you were a spiteful hateful closeminded bigot. They’ll have your lying ads, annotated with footnotes showing how you knew you were lying at the time. They’ll have your ugly homophobic comments and your hate-filled fake news reports captured in crystal clarity on whatever magical Internet++ they’re using decades from now. And they’re going to be ashamed of you.

All you’ve done — all you’ve accomplished with your lies and hate and fearmongering — is to delay the inevitable. In the next few years, every widow who loses her home because she “wasn’t really married” to her life partner, and the life partner’s kids have a good lawyer? Every man who dies scared and alone because the man who should have been his husband wasn’t allowed to be at his bedside? Every not-spouse who dies because of not-health-coverage, coverage they would have gotten were they married? Every one of those things that happens between now and whenever the National Guard puts a little learnin’ on you? That’s on you.

That’s your legacy.

(read the rest)

Women in the Fight

October 26, 2009

Images of Women in WWII.

(via Elizabeth Bear)

This is Not My Beautiful Life…

October 23, 2009

I first noticed this phenomenon in the photos of folks I have on my Yahoo IM chat list. More often than not, women with young children would use the photo of their children as their avatar photo. The first couple times, you figure, hey, they’re just really proud of their kids. Then I saw my mom use a photo of my neice and nephew as her user pic on Facebook and I thought… huh?

On the one hand, as the author points out, it’s almost refreshing to see a focus other than me-me-me on traditionally me-centric social media sites. On the other hand… um? I’m proud of a good many things in my life, and no doubt if I ever have a child, I’ll be proud of them too, but why use the photo as a stand in for… me?

There are plenty of photos of folks with their best friends, mothers *with* their kids, fathers with their kids, and of course, whole families together that sit in as user pics. So it’s not like this is as huge a trend as the author points out. But it does come up often enough for me to go “hm,” too. I haven’t seen any fathers use pics of their children as their user photo, for instance. But I may just not be looking, or I don’t note them as much when I see them?

I wonder if it’s a mix of pride and guilt? Are you more likely to see working mothers using photos of their kids as avatars? I don’t buy that it’s about creating anonymity, as there are plenty of folks who just use objects/random scenery shots to hide behind. Is it really a flight from aging, like the author suggests? I don’t buy into that so much. I’d be interested to find the commonalities and differences among men and women alike (because there must be some guy, somewhere) who use their children’s photos for their social media pics.

I’d be interested, for instance, if it’s more likely working moms or stay at home moms who do it. Or is there a class distinction? Is it really an age difference? Do over-30s just view the web differently, and shy away from its me-centric nature more than 20-somethings? Or has our culture really shifted… now that we all have less children, we invest more in them… and more of ourselves in them, and carry them close the same way we would anything else we’d invested so much of our youth in?

Children have always been a source of pride. I just can’t ever see my grandmother posting a photo of her children as her user pic, if I could ever get her to join FB…

Pathfinder

October 20, 2009

This was not the movie I wanted to see. See, I wanted somebody to take the opportunity to tell the story about complex, fully developed Native American societies whoopin some Viking ass.

Instead, it’s just another cliched ramble about “noble savages” getting saved by The Great White Hope.

It was like watching 10,000 BC… in Saskatchewan.

Divide and Conquer

October 3, 2009

Excellent.

Katha Pollitt Moneyshot

October 1, 2009

“The widespread support for Polanski shows the liberal cultural elite at its preening, fatuous worst. They may make great movies, write great books, and design beautiful things, they may have lots of noble humanitarian ideas and care, in the abstract, about all the right principles: equality under the law, for example. But in this case, they’re just the white culture-class counterpart of hip-hop fans who stood by R. Kelly and Chris Brown and of sports fans who automatically support their favorite athletes when they’re accused of beating their wives and raping hotel workers.

No wonder Middle America hates them.”

Read the rest.

Someday I Will Be Famous Enough to Fix My Covers

September 29, 2009

I saw the initial row over this, but somehow the resolution totally passed me by (I don’t spend nearly as much time on the internets these days). There are lots of stories about SF/F publishers whitewashing covers. So even if you’ve got a heroine who’s a far darker shade of pale, it’s unlikely it’ll be seen on the bookshelf.

This was one of those, “Yeah, and this surprises people because…?” But it’s important to remember that our silence as authors can be read as complicity. If you don’t say something publicly – even if you’re fuming – readers assume you’re just going along with it. And that’s a shame. Because as somebody who has sometimes wanted to drag a publisher out and kick them in the shins publicly, I can tell you I’m not so keen on doing it because it means, you know, I might be out a meal ticket.

That said, I need to choose my battles. Because if I end up with a whitewashed cover someday, I’m going to have to say something about it. Even if it means the loss of a meal ticket. Because at the end of the day, it’s about systematic silencing, erasing. It’s about lying.

That said – and understanding what JL was up against – I find this to be a pretty cool win.

Bloomsbury backs down in Larbalestier race row

How (not ) to Write About Africa

September 5, 2009

I’ve read Binyavanga Wainaina’s essay How (not) to Write About Africa a few times, but here’s a great spin on it: How (not) to Write About Africa read by Djimon Hounsou.

(via deadbrowalking)

You can bet this is showing up in a GW book or two….

September 4, 2009

Moscowitz is founder of the International Security Coalition of Clergy, whose mission is to train Jews in self-defense and advance fighting techniques in the event of a terrorist attack on a synagogue. He says business was slow for his Coalition until May, when the FBI arrested a group accused of plotting to blow up synagogues in The Bronx. But now Moscowitz’s 100-hour synagogue self-defense course is in high demand.